Intermediate Officer: CWO4-5, Maj, LtCol

Intermediate Level Officer: CWO4, CWO5, Major, LtCol

Blink

By Malcolm Gladwell

blink-book-coverBlink is about the first two seconds of looking–the decisive glance that knows in an instant. Gladwell, the best-selling author of The Tipping Point, campaigns for snap judgments and mind reading with a gift for translating research into splendid storytelling. Building his case with scenes from a marriage, heart attack triage, speed dating, choking on the golf course, selling cars, and military maneuvers, he persuades readers to think small and focus on the meaning of “thin slices” of behavior. The key is to rely on our “adaptive unconscious”–a 24/7 mental valet–that provides us with instant and sophisticated information to warn of danger, read a stranger, or react to a new idea.

Available in multiple formats on Amazon here.

Battle Cry of Freedom

By James McPherson

Battle_Cry_of_Freedom_(book)_coverFilled with fresh interpretations and information, puncturing old myths and challenging new ones, Battle Cry of Freedom will unquestionably become the standard one-volume history of the Civil War. 
James McPherson’s fast-paced narrative fully integrates the political, social, and military events that crowded the two decades from the outbreak of one war in Mexico to the ending of another at Appomattox. 

Available in multiple formats on Amazon here.

Boyd: The Fighter Pilot Who Changed The Art of War

By Robert Coram

boyd-bookJohn Boyd may be the most remarkable unsung hero in all of American military history. Some remember him as the greatest U.S. fighter pilot ever — the man who, in simulated air-to-air combat, defeated every challenger in less than forty seconds. Some recall him as the father of our country’s most legendary fighter aircraft — the F-15 and F-16. Still others think of Boyd as the most influential military theorist since Sun Tzu. They know only half the story. Boyd, more than any other person, saved fighter aviation from the predations of the Strategic Air Command. His manual of fighter tactics changed the way every air force in the world flies and fights.

Available in multiple formats on Amazon here.

Brute: The Life of Victor Krulak

By Robert Coram

brute-krulakFrom the earliest days of his thirty-four-year military career, Victor “Brute” Krulak displayed a remarkable facility for applying creative ways of fighting to the Marine Corps. He went on daring spy missions, was badly wounded, pioneered the use of amphibious vehicles, and masterminded the invasion of Okinawa. In Korea, he was a combat hero and invented the use of helicopters in warfare. In Vietnam, he developed a holistic strategy in stark contrast to the Army’s “Search and Destroy” methods-but when he stood up to LBJ to protest, he was punished. And yet it can be argued that all of his these accomplishments pale in comparison to what he did after World War II and again after Korea: Krulak almost single-handedly stopped the U.S. government from abolishing the Marine Corps. 

Available in multiple formats on Amazon here.

 Carnage and Culture

By Victor Davis Hanson

carnage-and-cultureExamining nine landmark battles from ancient to modern times–from Salamis, where outnumbered Greeks devastated the slave army of Xerxes, to Cortes’s conquest of Mexico to the Tet offensive–Victor Davis Hanson explains why the armies of the West have been the most lethal and effective of any fighting forces in the world.

Available in multiple formats on Amazon here.

Defeat Into Victory: Battling Japan in Burma and India, 1942-1945

By William Slim

defeat-into-victory-bookField Marshal Viscount Slim (1891-1970) led shattered British forces from Burma to India in one of the lesser-known but more nightmarish retreats of World War II. He then restored his army’s fighting capabilities and morale with virtually no support from home and counterattacked. His army’s slaughter of Japanese troops ultimately liberated India and Burma.

Available in multiple formats on Amazon here.

Forgotten Warriors: The 1st Provisional Marine Brigade, the Corps Ethos, and the Korean War 

By T.X. Hammes

forgotten-warriors-1st-provisional-marine-brigade-corps-ethos-t-x-hammes-paperback-cover-artWhen the Korean War broke out in 1950, the Marine Corps was ordered to deploy an air-ground brigade in less than ten days, even though no such brigade existed at the time. Assembled from the woefully understrength 1st Marine Division and 1st Marine Air Wing units, the Brigade shipped out only six days after activation, sailed directly to Korea, was in combat within ninety-six hours of landing and, despite these enormous handicaps and numerically superior enemy forces, won every one of its engagements and helped secure the Pusan Perimeter.

Available in multiple formats on Amazon here.

Command Culture

By Jörg Muth

command-culture-muthIn Command Culture, Jörg Muth examines the different paths the United States Army and the German Armed Forces traveled to select, educate, and promote their officers in the crucial time before World War II. Muth demonstrates that the military education system in Germany represented an organized effort where each school and examination provided the stepping stone for the next. But in the United States, there existed no communication about teaching contents or didactical matters among the various schools and academies, and they existed in a self chosen insular environment.

Available in multiple formats on Amazon here.

Hot, Flat, and Crowded

By T Freidman

hot_flat_and_crowdedPulitzer Prize-winning author Thomas Friedman explains how global warming, rapidly growing populations, and the astonishing expansion of the world’s middle class through globalization have produced a planet that is “hot, flat, and crowded.”

Available in multiple formats on Amazon here.

Just And Unjust Wars

By Michael Walzer

just-and-unjust-warsFrom the Athenian attack on Melos to the My Lai Massacre, from the wars in the Balkans through the first war in Iraq, Michael Walzer examines the moral issues surrounding military theory, war crimes, and the spoils of war. He studies a variety of conflicts over the course of history, as well as the testimony of those who have been most directly involved–participants, decision makers, and victims. In his introduction to this new edition, Walzer specifically addresses the moral issues surrounding the war in and occupation of Iraq, reminding us once again that “the argument about war and justice is still a political and moral necessity.”

Available in multiple formats on Amazon here.

Military Innovation in the Interwar Period

By Williamson Murray and Allan Millett

9780521552417This study of major military innovations in the 1920s and 1930s explores differences in innovating exploitation by the seven major military powers. This volume of comparative essays investigates how and why innovation occurred or did not occur, and explains much of the strategic and operative performance of the Axis and Allies in World War II.

Available in multiple formats on Amazon here.

Ripples of Battle

By Victor Davis Hanson

ripples-of-battleThe effects of war refuse to remain local: they persist through the centuries, sometimes in unlikely ways far removed from the military arena. In Ripples of Battle, the acclaimed historian Victor Davis Hanson weaves wide-ranging military and cultural history with his unparalleled gift for battle narrative as he illuminates the centrality of war in the human experience.

Available in multiple formats on Amazon here.

The Age of the Unthinkable: Why the New World Disorder Constantly Surprises Us And What We Can Do About It

By Joshua Ramo

unthinkableThe traditional physics of power has been replaced by something radically different. In The Age of the Unthinkable, Joshua Cooper Ramo puts forth a revelatory new model for understanding our dangerously unpredictable world. Drawing upon history, economics, complexity theory, psychology, immunology, and the science of networks, he describes a new landscape of inherent unpredictability–and remarkable, wonderful possibility.

Available in multiple formats on Amazon here.

The Warriors: Reflections on Men in Battle

By J. Glenn Gray

the-warriors-grayJ. Glenn Gray entered the army as a private in May 1941, having been drafted on the same day he was informed of his doctorate in philosophy from Columbia University. He was discharged as a second lieutenant in October 1945, having been awarded a battlefield commission during fighting in France. Gray saw service in North Africa, Italy, France, and Germany in a counter-espionage unit. Fourteen years after his discharge, Gray began to reread his war journals and letters in an attempt to find some meaning in his wartime experiences. The result is The Warriors, a philosophical meditation on what warfare does to us and an examination of the reasons soldiers act as they do. Gray explains the attractions of battle—the adrenaline rush, the esprit de corps—and analyzes the many rationalizations made by combat troops to justify their actions. In the end, Gray notes, “War reveals dimensions of human nature both above and below the acceptable standards for humanity.”

Available in multiple formats on Amazon here.

This Kind of War

By T.R. Fehrenbach

this-kind-of-warTHIS KIND OF WAR is the most comprehensive single-volume history of the Korean-American conflict that began in 1950 and is still affecting United States’ foreign policy. Fifty years later, not only does this enlightening account give details of the tactics, infantrymen and equipment, but also chronicles the story of military and political unpreparedness that led to a profligate loss of American lives in Korea.

Available in multiple formats on Amazon here.